INBA Response to Sinclair Promo

INBA President Laura Trendle Polus released this statement Monday, after consulting with the INBA Board of Directors:

  A video featuring anchors at numerous Sinclair-owned stations reading promo copy has gone viral. In the copy, which apparently went to all 192 Sinclair stations, the anchors say they and their stations are concerned about “the troubling trend of irresponsible, one-sided news stories plaguing our country.” The INBA is also troubled by this trend.
  Of course, many believe Sinclair is a major offender when it comes to one-sided news stories. Criticism of their must-runs and conservative commentary has been swirling for months.
  Sinclair has now responded to the outcry. SVP Scott Livingston sent a message to newsrooms Monday, firing back at the criticisms. We share Sinclair’s expressed concern about demonstrably fake stories such as “Pope Endorses Trump,” and “Pizzagate.” 
  The Illinois News Broadcasters Association has long stood for the best parts of journalism. For fair, unbiased reporting. For using multiple sources. For emphasizing localism. Our Code of Ethics says we will “check the accuracy of the facts and report them objectively and impartially” and also that we will “vigorously defend guarantees in the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.”
  We have many current and former INBA members at Sinclair stations. They are not bad journalists. They are not bad people. But what they are being made to do is not good. Journalists should not be required to broadcast information with a specific agenda. Our democracy relies on an informed citizenry. If we are not given the freedoms to inform our citizenry with unbiased information, we have failed to do our jobs. 
  Amid growing criticism of cable news coverage, local TV news remains one of the most trusted sources, and local news is where INBA members are working every day, every night, and every weekend. But the trust is getting thinner, and what Sinclair is doing is threatening to destroy what’s left of it.

Michelle Eccles McLaughlin

INBA is an organization that really caters to continuing education for professionals. It offers a relatively inexpensive way to learn new things, reinforce best practices and network.

Ryan Denham

“I recently attended my first INBA conference—and it won’t be my last. The combination of professional and student journalists learning together is electric. Everyone learns from each other and walks away with new friends (and LinkedIn connections). I know I did.”

Molly Jirasek

One of my top goals in my career was to get to Chicago. Thanks to INBA I met Margaret Larkin. She remembered our great conversations about Chicago and first alerted me to a job opening in the city I might be interested in. Lo and behold, I got that job! INBA helped me reach my dream.

Andrew Tanielian

INBA taught me how to network in a meaningful way. The scholarship process taught me how to endure a hard job interview and thrive.

Mike Miletich

Joining the INBA was one of my best life decisions. I met some of the best broadcast journalists while I was still a college student. Plus, I ended up getting a job through the connections I made!

Nora Baldner

The support INBA gives to student journalists is vitally important as we all discover how technology is changing news dissemination, INBA monitors and actively encourages truth, transparency and accountability from students and their universities.

Alexis McAdams

INBA played a huge part in preparing me for my broadcasting career. The INBA conventions connect students with on-air talent and news directors who give feedback on now to improve your work. Through relationships I made at those conventions, I was able to obtain my first on air reporting job.

Bob Roberts

INBA is as much about friendship and as it is about achieving common goals. It provides two things individual newsrooms cannot: in-service training, and the ability to speak out on issues affecting the profession. But most of all, it brings newspeople together.

Aaron Eades

As a student, it's often difficult to picture what working in the real world will be like. For me, the INBA bridged that gap by giving me the chance to talk to professionals who used to be in the same shoes I'm in now.

Brian O'Keefe

One of the greatest benefits for me has been getting to see and know other parts of the state. I’m not from Illinois and traveling to spring and fall conventions over the years has transformed dots on a map to memories of places that enhance my story telling process.

Jennifer Fuller

INBA is not only a great networking tool, it also provides advocacy and support for journalists in an ever-changing world.

Jeff Bossert

When I was working in radio for the first time, I had no idea whether I could truly handle the demands. But INBA made me curious and want to improve. Even now, when I’ve maybe worked a lot of hours or planned some stories that didn’t come together for one reason or another, what I learn from an INBA conference gets me re-invigorated about the business.

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